Tag Archives: Heuristics

(Good) Testers Are Not Robots!

Toy RobotReading James Bach’s recent blog post this morning, “The Essence of Heuristics” – in particular the list of questions at the end – I was reminded, by way of stark contrast, of the testing culture I found when I started my current consulting gig.

One of the first things I was told was one of their testing “rules” – every test case should be repeated, with different data, 15 times. At first I simply marveled at this, privately. I figured someone must have a good reason for choosing 15 as the magic number. Why not 5? Or, for that matter, 256? Why every test case? Surely my time would be better spent doing a new test case instead of the 15th iteration of the current one, right?

Sooner or later, I thought, the rule’s reasonableness should become apparent. After a couple weeks I knew the team a little better, but the rule still seemed as absurd to me as when I first heard it, so I broached the topic.

“Why do you run 15 iterations of every test case?”

“Well, sometimes when we run tests, the first 10 or 12 will pass, but then the 11th or 13th, for example, will fail.”

“Okay, well, do you ever then try to discover what exactly the differences were between the passing and failing tests? So that you can be sure in the future you’ll have tests for both scenarios?”

<blank stare>

I quickly came to realize that this testing “rule” was symptomatic of a larger issue: an attitude in management that the team couldn’t be trusted to approach the testing problem intelligently. I saw evidence of this attitude in other ways. For example, we were told that all bug descriptions needed to include the date and time the bug occurred, so that the programmers would know where to look in the log files. When I pointed out that not all bugs will involve issues with logged events, I was told that they just didn’t want to confuse the junior team members.

Another example – and a particular pet peeve of mine – is the requirement that every test case include detailed step-by-step instructions to follow, leaving no room for creative thinking, interpretation, or exploration. The reasoning behind the excruciating detail, of course, is so the newest team members can start testing right away. My first objection to this notion is that the fresh eyes of a new user can see problems that veterans have become blind to. As such, putting blinders on the newbies is not a good idea. Also, why bypass the testing of product’s usability and/or the help documentation and user manual? New users are a great resource for that.

In short, testers are not robots, and treating them like they are will result in lower quality testing efforts.

Share